Introducing the world’s fastest autofocus



Want to take better photos of moving objects? Check out Sony’s new a6300 camera with the world’s fastest autofocus

Sports, wildlife and other popular types of photography involve capturing moving objects – whether a player rising to head a ball, or a bird soaring across the sky. 

Now you can better capture such scenes with a new Sony camera that boasts the world’s fastest autofocus and 4K video capabilities.

Sony autofocus a6300

What is the Sony a6300?

It’s the follow-up to one of the most popular interchangeable lens cameras of recent times, the Sony A600.

The a6300 captures DSLR-quality images in a smaller package thanks to its mirrorless design.

This type of camera is known as a compact system camera, and is the only real alternative to a DSLR.

 

What’s autofocus and why does it matter?

Your camera’s autofocus, or AF, system works out what it should be focusing on when you point your camera towards a scene.

Without it, you’d have to make the adjustments manually using the camera’s controls.

There are different types of AF:

  • Phase-detection AF: fast and gives good results when shooting fast-moving scenes – normally found on CSC/DSLR cameras.
  • Contrast-detection AF: slower, but capable of greater accuracy for stationary scenes – normally found on compact cameras.

Many Sony cameras use Fast Hybrid AF.

 

What is Sony’s Fast Hybrid AF?

It’s an autofocus system that sees contrast-detection and phase-detection technology work together to create better autofocus results.

It gives ‘added precision’ and a ‘quick response when tracking fast-moving subjects’.

 

How fast can the Sony a6300 focus?

When shooting with the Sony a6300 you can ‘lock focus on your subject in as little as 0.05 seconds’. Sony says this is the ‘world’s fastest autofocus acquisition time’.

So how can it focus so fast? The number of phase detection AF points is important.

These are focus points positioned in different places across the image area so you can focus quickly no matter where in the frame your subject is.

More of these AF points mean faster focusing. And the Sony has 425 phase detection AF points – compared to 179 on the Sony A600.

With focus points covering nearly the entire field of view you can accurately focus on small, fast objects that ‘other cameras would fail to recognise,’ says Sony.

Tracking is more accurate too, as the camera can adjust AF points to suit your subject’s movement – be it an athlete or an animal.

 Sony a6300 autofocus

Credit: Sony

Shoot video in 4K UHD

You can record video in super-sharp 4K resolution, for videos with exceptional detail and depth – play them back on your 4K UHD TV.

When shooting video, the camera will focus approximately twice as fast as its predecessor. It’s not just 4K. You can also shoot Full HD at 120 fps (frames per second).

You can add audio to your videos too by plugging a mic into the microphone jack.

                             

Take detailed pictures in low light

Your photography will look sharp and detailed thanks to the large APS-C sensor.

The most important element of an image sensor is the amount of light it lets in. The larger the sensor, the more light used to create the image.

The largest type of sensor is full frame, normally only found on DSLRs. The Sony camera features an APS-C, one of the next largest types of sensor.

It’s even better at collecting light thanks to the use of copper wiring in its design. Resolution-wise, the sensor has 24.2 megapixels.

 

Solid design and clever controls

The camera is tough enough for life on the road thanks to its magnesium alloy design. 

It’s mirrorless, which makes it relatively small and lightweight. There’s an angled touchscreen than can be positioned to take selfies, too.

And you can share photos with your phone or tablet in a simple tap, using NFC technology, which allows files to be transferred wirelessly between two devices that are close to one another.

Find the perfect camera for you.