TV and Social Media in 2015



We created a shortlist of our 16 top shows across television, Netflix and Amazon Prime from 2015. Using social media analytics tool Crimson Hexagon, we then analysed a whopping 45,000,000 tweets, worldwide, to gather some interesting data.

 Multiscreen

The rise of ’second screen’ viewing


Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you might have noticed online streaming services, like Netflix and Amazon Prime, are changing the way we watch TV.

While we’re watching our favourite programmes, we’re also talking about what we’re watching online. Many of us can’t wait to talk about the latest hit series and we’re logging on to give an instant verdict.

This second screen experience, or ‘augmented reality’, is taking off in a big way. A staggering 87% of Americans using more than one device at a time while watching the telly, according to an Accenture report.1

Put simply, TV has gone social and we’ve evolved into ‘media multi-taskers’.



Why do we tweet about TV?

We were keen to take a closer look at the Twitter activity of the multi-screen generation to better understand these new developments.

We created a shortlist of our 16 top shows across television, Netflix and Amazon Prime from 2015. Using social media analytics tool Crimson Hexagon, we then analysed a whopping 45,000,000 tweets, worldwide, to gather some interesting data.

We found that the reasons we tweet about shows is varied. For some, a crazy plot twist is enough to send us online.

The event-packed Game of Thrones season finale drove more Twitter posts (just over 1.7 million) than 11 of our shows did over the whole of last year, including House of Cards (1.65), True Detective (nearly 1.5) and Jessica Jones (also close to 1.5.) In fact, this episode alone drove more tweets than Daredevil (700k), Strictly Come Dancing (288k), Fargo (182k) and The Man in the High Castle (130k) combined, over the course of the whole year.

The mere promise of an episode can drive social media into a frenzy. There were no new Sherlock episodes broadcast in 2015, but that didn’t stop it overtaking other shows for the amount of tweets, generating 1.1 million posts and over four billion impressions.

Using our powers of deduction, we can infer that the announcement of an episode on New Year's Day 2016 may have impacted these numbers.



TV in the news

News events around the show can also have a big impact on tweet numbers. Of course, controversy travels furthest (and fastest) on social media, so it’s no surprise that Top Gear’s Jeremy Clarkson’s antics drove people to post.

It’s no surprise, that when news of his fracas with a producer and subsequent sacking from the BBC broke, it drew more traffic than when any episodes were broadcast.

Our visual guide delves further into how social media is changing how we’re interacting with TV and who wins in the battle for subscribers between Netflix and Amazon.

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