What is HDR TV?



Want to feel like you're actually in the stadium? Then you’ll need to invest in a HDR TV. Find out why it offers the very best for match days…

What is HDR TV

You might think your Full HD TV is impressive – but have you checked out the latest in TV tech?

In the past decade it’s evolved from Full HD to super-detailed 4K UHD and OLED TVs – and now HDR. And the enhancements it brings to your home entertainment system will blow your mind.

But don’t worry, it’s not here to make 4K TV obsolete – it works hand in hand with 4K and OLED to create incredible picture quality.

With Netflix, Blu-ray and the BBC on-board with HDR video, isn’t it time you got a TV that was too?

 

How does HDR make TV look better?  

HDR video literally lets you see a billion different colours – giving movie makers more colours and shades of black and white to play with.

With a HDR TV colour and detail looks just as the director intended in your home.

HDR – aka high dynamic range – takes the two most important elements in picture quality, contrast ratio and colour accuracy, and seriously ups their game.

You get much more detail in the shadows and pure brilliance in colour. Clear blue skies, football pitches and sun shining off a car bonnet – they all look awesome in HDR.

‘HDR is set to change the way we see colour and detail in our homes,’ says our large screen TV buyer and man-in-the-know, James Parker.

Our range of TVs

How HDR works with 4K and 4K OLED

TV picture quality is defined by its resolution – basically the number of pixels on screen. And it doesn’t get much better than 4K and 4K OLED.

HDR improves the quality of these pixels – so you enjoy four times the detail with 4K resolution, but with even better colour, contrast and detail.

HDR body

What can I watch in HDR?

Even Marvel’s Iron Fist has been shot in HDR. Check out how it was made in 4K HDR

Amazon Instant Video also has 4K HDR content – with its offering growing all the time.

Home cinema fan? Combine your 4K HDR TV with an Ultra HD Blu-ray player and 4K discs to enjoy the benefits of HDR on Blu-ray – find out more 

What can I watch?

Bright and bold

HDR TVs offer millions more colours – reds are bolder, greens are stronger and blues deeper.

Contrasting colours are so precise and vividly rendered you appreciate every little detail – from a blade of grass to a strand of hair.

 

Brighter whites and deeper blacks

The DR in HDR is ‘dynamic range’ – it refers to the shades from dark to light that your TV produces.

In older TV sets this range is much smaller – the end result is greys instead of blacks and dull whites. But a HDR TV has a much broader spectrum creating bright whites and deeper blacks.

This is helped along by powerful backlights and sophisticated dimming technology that create a brighter picture and add depth. What is local dimming?Samsung QE65

The best TVs for HDR

Arguably the best around, Samsung QLED TVs get the most from HDR – combining incredibly bright screens with superb colour and contrast.

Brightness is measured in a unit called 'nits' and QLED TVs can reach 2,000-nit peak brightness – much brighter than any other TV.

With striking brightness and exceptional shadow detail when watching Ultra HD Blu-ray or Netflix 4K HDR on a QLED TV it’ll be hard to distinguish real life from the movie.

In the past when TVs were at peak brightness colours were left looking washed out – but Samsung QLED TVs keep their vibrancy.

Tiny crystals that display over a billion colours – called quantum dots – deliver 100% colour volume and are a world first.

Expect jaw-dropping colour that’s true-to-life and totally realistic.

All of Samsung's 6 Series and upwards boast impressive HDR. Check out the Samsung QE65 or other Samsung QLED TVs

 

What about the formats?

HDR video is made available in two different formats…

  • HDR10 – used by LG, Samsung, Sony, Sharp, Panasonic – lets you enjoy content from Netflix, Amazon and 4K Blu-ray
  • Dolby Vision – LG and Sony support this format with Amazon and Netflix streaming it

In the words of TV-guru, James Parker, HDR is ‘the next step in home entertainment’.

 

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